May 10 2022 - Seattle, WA, United States

National Geographic Society & The Pledge Partner to Support Climate Storytelling

National Geographic Explorers documenting the global climate crisis

By The Climate Pledge Team

The collaboration will support National Geographic Explorers documenting the global climate crisis as part of the Society’s Global Storytellers Fund.

“ Storytelling has the ability to change the world, to show people things they couldn't imagine or that they can’t see. To change the way they think, the way we act. Science often provides the intellectual framework, appeals to your head, but storytelling can go to the heart. ”

Kaitlin Yarnall

Chief Storytelling Officer, National Geographic Society

The Climate Pledge is collaborating with the National Geographic Society to support climate storytelling as part of the Society’s Global Storytellers Fund. Over the next three years, we will empower 15 National Geographic Explorers to document the global climate crisis through authentic storytelling and illuminate the challenges, solutions, and communities on the front lines. The collaboration will also support up to 45 mentees as part of the Society’s Second Assistant Program, which empowers early career women and storytellers of color by training them and placing them in the field alongside National Geographic Explorers.

The first five National Geographic Explorers to be supported through this collaboration include:

Climate resilience in communities facing glacier melt in the Himalayas, Alps, and the Andes

Peatland ecosystems globally focused on five significant peatlands in Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Northern Europe

  • Miora Rajaonary

Climate impacts on food supply and agricultural solutions to Southern Madagascar’s “Kéré,” or period of hunger

Traditional Indigenous methods of conservation land-management and climate change mitigation communities in Russia’s Bikin National Park and Palau

Climate and environmental justice in the Southern United States

Explorers clockwise from top left: Miora Rajaonary, Ciril Jazbec, Luján Agusti, Kiliii Yüyan, Asha Stuart
Explorers clockwise from top left: Miora Rajaonary, Ciril Jazbec, Luján Agusti, Kiliii Yüyan, Asha Stuart

Project Spotlight: Black Glaciers of Tierra del Fuego

In an era that is so traversed by digital influence, anthotypes scans represent a magic of losing control and moving away from the “perfect image,” inviting randomness. The exploration of these images reflect on the place that peat bogs have historically occupied in society, despite the great environmental value they have. These images question the beauty and hegemony of the image.
Left: Two horses at Andorra Valley, close to Uhuaia, Tierra de Fuego. Right: Portrait of Nair Salome, young inhabitant of Ushuaia, in the woods
Left: Two horses at Andorra Valley, close to Uhuaia, Tierra de Fuego. Right: Portrait of Nair Salome
Left: Detail of flowers near the Andorra Valley.Right: Portrait of CADIC (Austral Center for Scientific Research) specialist Julio Escobar during a walk at Tierra Mayor Valley.
Left: Detail of flowers near the Andorra Valley. Right: Portrait of CADIC (Austral Center for Scientific Research)
Left: Portrait of Lara Gazzaniga, young inhabitant of Ushuaia, in the area of Andorra Valley, where there used to be a peat extraction enterprise that was stopped and abandoned some years ago.Right: Illustration of an archive image taken of two women of the original Selknam people who were inhabitants of the center of Tierra del Fuego Island, in an area of large peat bogs.
Left: Portrait of Lara Gazzaniga, young inhabitant of Ushuaia. Right: Illustration of an image taken of two women
Left: Aerial View of the area of Olivia River Valley.Right: Portrait of Nicolás Deluca, inhabitant of Ushuaia, in the coastal area of the city.
Left: Aerial View of the area of Olivia River Valley. Right: Portrait of Nicolás Deluca, inhabitant of Ushuaia
Portrait of Rodolfo Iturraspe. Rodolfo is a renowned local hydrologist, researcher focused on hydrological regulatory systems of Southern Patagonia, especially glaciers and southern wetlands.
Portrait of Rodolfo Iturraspe. Rodolfo is a renowned local hydrologist
These anthotypes are made with an emulsion that included turmeric and peat extracted from a peat bog that is in recovery from being drained, located in the area of the valley near the Olivia River. They were created by painting paper with an emulsion containing the material and, together with an image in transparency, exposing them to sunlight, which creates the image.

Peatlands are a type of wetland with accumulation of organic matter in basins generally of glacial origin. They form when the deposited organic material exceeds the decomposition in a lagoon or swamp after glaciers left. Peatlands are considered one of the largest biological carbon deposits in the world. They are common in North America, Northern Europe, and Patagonia. The Island of Tierra del Fuego houses 95% of the peatlands of Argentina, including those of Peninsula Mitre, the largest in South America. Fuegian peatlands arose as a result of the decrease and disappearance of glaciers, and may be up to 18 thousand years old. Many times these peatlands are known as BLACK GLACIERS.

-Luján Agusti
National Geographic Explorer, Argentina

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